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Archive for March, 2017

Interesting one today:

On one of our production machines, we recently added a new LUN to a SQL cluster. A task like this is a team effort. Sysadmins perform some steps and DBA carry out the remaining. In this article, the main focus is on covering the steps after the LUN is added to the OS & Sql Cluster by the sysadmins.  For context, we’ll start with high level steps before going into details.

Sysadmins steps

  1. Add new storage to the machine/OS as an available storage
  2. Format the available drive with appropriate settings (cluster size) and add it as a new drive
  3. Make drive available to the Cluster using “Add Disk” screen in FailOver Cluster Management tool.

DBAs steps

  1. Add available storage to Sql Cluster
  2. Configure dependency (and check the report before & after)
  3. Add data file on the new cluster storage drive

Here we’ll cover the DBA steps in detail:

Some of these steps were covered under a different recent article as part of dealing with an error message, but here we’ll cover it as a task by itself (which it is).

Add New Storage

Once sysadmins have made the new storage as an ‘available storage’ to OS Cluster, it needs to be added as a new storage location to the SQL Cluster.

In FailOver cluster manager, go to Sql Server Resource Group for this SQL Cluster and right click for detailed options and choose “Add Storage” (see image below)

sqlcluster_addnewstorage_to_os_cluster

Once successful, go to Storage\Disks under in FailOver Cluster Manager to confirm the availability. See image below:

sqlcluster_addnewdrive

Configure Dependency

Adding the storage is an important step, and equally important step is adding the new drive to Sql Cluster Dependency Chain. Dependency Chain informs Sql Sever “how to act”, when any resource in the Cluster becomes unavailable. Some resources automatically trigger cluster failover to other node; some resources do not. This decision is made based on the configurations in Dependency Chain.

Example:

Critical: Data drive/LUN that has database files is critical for optimal availability of the Sql Cluster. So, if it becomes unavailable, failing over to other available nodes is imperative to keep the cluster available.

Non-Critical: In some scenarios, Sql Server Agent is not considered as Critical. So if it stops for some reason, Cluster will make multiple attempts to start it on the same node, but may not necessarily cause failover.

This is a business decision. All these “response actions” will be configured in Cluster settings.

Now, check the dependency report (before); We can see that new drive exists in Cluster, but is not yet added to the Dependency Chain.

SqlCluster_DependencyReport.PNG

To Configure Dependency Chain, go to the Sql Server Resource Group under Roles in FailOver Cluster Manager. See the image below for clarity:

Then go to the bottom section for this Resource Group, where all the individual resources that are part of this Resource Group are displayed.

Under “Other Resources“, right click on Sql Server Resource and choose properties.

do As show

sqlcluster_addnewstorage_add_to_dependency

In the “Sql Server Properties” window, we can see the existing resources already added to dependency chain logic.

SqlCluster_Dependency_Before.PNG

Now, go to the end of the logic list and choose “AND” for condition and pick the new Cluster Storage to be included. See image below for clarity:

SqlCluster_Dependency_After.PNG

After saving the settings, regenerate the Dependency Chain report. Now, we’ll see the new drive as part of the logic.

sqlcluster_dependencyreport_after

Add Database Data File to New Cluster Storage

Now, that the new drive is ready, we could easily add a new data file to the new location.

--
-- Add data file to new storage location
--
USE [master]
GO
ALTER DATABASE [SampleDB]
ADD FILE
	(
		  NAME 			= 	N'SampleDB_Data3'
		, FILENAME 		= 	N'U:\MSSQL\Data\SampleDB_Data3.NDF'
		, SIZE 			= 	3500 GB
		, FILEGROWTH 	= 	100 GB
		, MAXSIZE 		= 	3900 GB
	)
TO FILEGROUP [PRIMARY]
GO
Hope this helps,
_Sqltimes

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Quick one today:

Earlier today, we ran into this error in our lab environment with replication. Two different errors, on the same environment, due to similar sequence of events.

Msg 20584, Level 16, State 1, Procedure sp_MSrepl_check_server, Line 67
Cannot drop server because it is used as a Subscriber to remote Publisher in replication.

Cannot drop server because it is used as a distributor in replication

This type of errors are rare, but one of these three options below might provide some relief.

  1. Reset Dist flag
  2. Force drop distributor
  3. Manually remove Publishers (from Distributor properties)

Also, see the notes in the bottom section (points to keep in mind)

Reset Dist Flag for Distributor Instance

Sometimes, the dist flag for Distributor stays set, when not supposed to. So manually resetting it helps.

--
--  Reset Distributor flag
--
EXEC master.dbo.sp_ServerOption   @server = 'REPLDist'
				, @OptName = 'dist'
				, @OptValue = 'false'
GO

Force Drop Distributor

One of the last options is to ‘force’ drop distributor. This allows removing distributor database without running through the proper checks. This step is a high risk, high reward option; Since all checks were previously performed and all components of replication are removed, except distributor, this step might provide relief.

EXEC sp_dropdistributor @no_checks = 1, @ignore_distributor = 1
GO

Manually Remove Publishers

Usually, the above two steps will resolve the issue. But in rare occasions, the issue persists, like in our lab. For those stubborn situation, this technique has given some relief.

Go to Replication >> Distributor Properties >> Go to Publishers (tab)

Now, un-check each Publisher and save. Important to note that, this needs to be done for one publisher at a time.

Distributor_Properties_RemovePublishers.PNG

Points to keep in mind:

Sometimes, just the one of these steps might be enough to resolve the issue; Sometimes, it might take two of the steps. In our lab, we ended up needing all the 3 steps. the first step is easy to implement.
The second and third steps might need repeated attempts. Something like, try Step 2, if it fails, then try step 3; If Step 3 succeeds, then go back to Step 2. Once Step 2 is successful, the distributor is fully cleared and cleaned.
Hope this helps,
_Sqltimes

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Quick one today:

Given the usage of UNPIVOT is not that common as PIVOT (which itsel is more uncommon than other techniques in TSQL), the occurance of this error is even more remote. Luckly, we ran into it earlier:

Msg 8167, Level 16, State 1, Line 5
The type of column conflicts with the type of other columns specified in the UNPIVOT list.

Following is the UNPIVOT statement that threw the error. As you can see, on the surface, everything looks correct.

--
--	UNPIVOT syntax that throws error
--
SELECT ID, Metrics, Measures
FROM	(
	SELECT	  Daily_Health_Check_ID
			, Environment
			, DataCenter
	FROM SampleTable
	) AS Source
UNPIVOT
(
	Measures FOR Metrics IN (Environment, DataCenter)
) AS UnPVT
GO

Now let’s change the datatype and size of all the columns to match.

--
--	After converting all colums to the same datatype & size
--
SELECT ID, Metrics, Measures
FROM	(
	SELECT	  Daily_Health_Check_ID
			, CONVERT(VARCHAR(20), Environment) AS [Environment]
			, CONVERT(VARCHAR(20), DataCenter) AS [DataCenter]
	FROM SampleTable
	) AS Source
UNPIVOT
(
	Measures FOR Metrics IN (Environment, DataCenter)
) AS UnPVT
GO

Voilà !! The key is to have uniformed data type & size of all columns in the source data set

Hope this helps,
_Sqltimes

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